Always In The Middle Of The Battle: Edward Kiniry And The 1st Illinois Light Artillery Battery D

Edward Kiniry And The 1st Illinois Light Artillery Battery D

by David Edward Wall


Formats

Softcover
$19.99
Hardcover
$29.99
E-Book
$9.99
Softcover
$19.99

Book Details

Language : English
Publication Date : 8/5/2010

Format : Softcover
Dimensions : 6x9
Page Count : 223
ISBN : 9781453545256
Format : Hardcover
Dimensions : 6x9
Page Count : 223
ISBN : 9781453545263
Format : E-Book
Dimensions : 6x9
Page Count : 223
ISBN : 9781453545270

About the Book

Chapter One: Orphaned and Alone in Manhattan Edward was an orphan at age ten, and he was now living with relative guardians who treated him with disdain. They certainly did not need another mouth to feed. Chapter Two: Edward Joined McAllister’s Battery and went camping. “The one who attacks now will be victorious, and the enemy will have to be in a hurry if he gets ahead of me. “ Ulysses S. Giant Chapter Three: Shiloh, Nothing Would Ever Be the Same Again. On my fall visit to Shiloh in 2006, the leaves were changing their uniforms for those of bright new fall shades, browns, oranges and reds, some so red they were almost purple. This contrasted to the green leaves and blood red earth that appeared on the ground those two deadly days in April, 1862. Chapter Four: Vicksburg The President then laid out the concerns and questions he had held about Grant’s movements and plans for capturing the city and concluded: “I now wish to make the Personal acknowledgment that you were right, and I was wrong.” A. Lincoln Chapter Five: Chattanooga “On, On I must go, to meet a soldiers fate .... “ William T. Sherman With the opening of the “cracker line,” the besieged army was eating better than the investing army. Chapter Six: Atlanta “At this critical moment a subordinate officer pulled out a pocket handkerchief and tied it to a ramrod, and was in the act of raising it in a token of surrender. Captain Cooper struck it down with his sword, explaining “Never! As long as there is a man left.” “ They had kept track of the guns by the sound, having come to know it as it were, their voices.” Chapter Seven: Railroads, Trains, Indians, Cow Chips, and Chaps “One day as Mr. Murphy & myself was baleing hay we heard someone crossing the Creek, Mike said there were Indians and told me to go to the cabin and get the guns. I started when a big Indian said hold up. I stopped and by then there was another one between me and the cabin so it was all off.


About the Author